March 4, 2017 – Class 4 of 12 of Lyndon LaRouche’s Economic and Epistemological Method class series – Speaker: Jason Ross

Discovering LaRouche’s Method:
A New York Class Series on Economics

The crisis facing especially the future of the United States, and the possibilities opened by the global revolt against the British System, require the creation of a real leadership in the American population. Without that development, whatever the Trump Presidency might do for the better is unlikely to succeed. Leadership in this context means an in-depth comprehension of the policies and method of the one figure who has foreseen the nature of the crisis and the solutions required, and has at the same time the respect internationally among nations such as Russia and China, Lyndon LaRouche.

Therefore, beginning Saturday, February 11, 2017, LaRouche PAC will present a 12-part series on LaRouche’s Discoveries in physical economy and the method that produced them. This will include classes on the unity of science and art, with presentations by Helga Zepp-LaRouche on Schiller and choral director John Sigerson on music. Other classes will include members of LaRouche’s research group.

Part I: The Mind and Universal Creativity

Kicking off a series of classes on the economics and epistemology of Lyndon LaRouche, Phil Rubinstein focuses on axiomatic change. When you change an underlying principle, everything changes. Glass-Steagall doesn’t adjust the financial system, it sets it on a fundamentally different basis. The progress of human economy demonstrates the necessity of scientific discovery. Creativity is intelligible.

February 11, 2017. Class 1 of 12 of Lyndon LaRouche’s Economic and Epistemological Method class series. Speaker: Phil Rubinstein.


Part II: The Basis for LaRouche’s Successful Forecasts

This is the second in a series of classes on the economic method of Lyndon LaRouche. It builds on the concept of human relationship to nature presented in the first class, and develops the criteria for successful, true economic growth. This knowledge is a basis for creating the urgently needed new level of economy.

February 18, 2017. Class 2 of 12 of Lyndon LaRouche’s Economic and Epistemological Method class series. Speaker: Phil Rubinstein.


Part III: The Value of Productivity

Economic science is a science of composition, not components. Can the value of a new technology be expressed in a scalar relationship to the cost to develop it? No. In this discussion, Jason Ross takes up several of Lyndon LaRouche’s ironic economic concepts to provide an effective framework to understand economic “value”: physical chemistry, infrastructure as an economic “platform,” and the unique characteristics of the human mind that make it all possible.

Homework for next time: Watch this video on Bernhard Riemann’s habilitation dissertation, “On the Hypotheses That Underlie Geometry.”

February 25, 2017. Class 3 of 12 of Lyndon LaRouche’s Economic and Epistemological Method class series. Speaker: Jason Ross.

Resources:
Short demonstration of Einstein’s non-existence of simultaneity.
Handout (pdf)
Presentation slides (pdf)
Changing Nature


Part IV: Non-Scalar Economic Value of Discovery

Economic modeling is a series of failures, literally. Every time there’s a fundamentally new discovery or technology, the models break down. Is there a way to directly represent the inherently incommensurable nature of human progress? Yes! In this fourth in a series of classes on Lyndon LaRouche’s economics, Jason Ross takes up the LaRouche-Riemann method, and a topological clue to representing economic growth.

March 4, 2017. Class 4 of 12 of Lyndon LaRouche’s Economic and Epistemological Method class series. Speaker: Jason Ross.

Resources:
Handout (pdf)
Slides (pdf)

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